HASHTAGS
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    name1 The Perfect Pottery for your Picnic
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    strydesc11 With summertime fast approaching, now is the time to start planning a picnic. From parks to hilltops, riversides to beaches, a picnic is a great way to relish the outdoors, savour fresh food and spend valuable time with your friends and family.

    Preparation is key when planning a picnic – this can save you plenty of time on the day of the event, and guarantee that you don’t forget any essential items. For instance, decide on a picnic basket or box to store your tableware and non-perishable foods within. A simple cooler can then be taken for chilled items including drinks.

    Classic picnic favourites including deli chicken, seasoned sausages, cheese and fruit can be served in small Ramekin dishes whilst breads and other meats are best shared on Platters. Always take sets of Plates and Bowls, bearing in mind that Bowls are the new Plates! Bowls are ideal for holding a range of different foods, they will also prevent any spillages and are easily stacked and stored. Taking an arrangement of different shapes and colours of tableware looks beautifully eclectic and suits the theming and mood of a summer picnic.

    For the Plates that are taken, choose Salad Plates as they are an amenable size and can be used for savoury and sweet dishes. Small Side Bowls have been designed to hold sauces, which makes them ideal for dips, oils as well as olives, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese. For dessert, choosing capacious Bowls which suit mousses, creme brulees, cakes and fruit pies. As part of our exclusive James Martin collection, the 5 Piece Cheese Knife Set is the perfect, compact kit to bring along with you for serving and sharing different cheeses. This Set incorporates four cheese knives and the versatile case which doubles as a contemporary cheese board.

    Finally, take the time to make a refreshing drink of elderflower cordial, cucumber and mint water or raspberry lemonade. If you are concerned about taking glassware with you, serve everyone a drink in a beautiful and durable stoneware Mug, or opt for a set of glass Tumblers if preferred. Our Heritage collections contain an array of sunshine hued Mugs, perfect for a picnic setting.

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    desc11 With summertime fast approaching, now is the time to start planning a picnic. From parks to hilltops, riversides to beaches, a picnic is a great way to relish the outdoors, savour fresh food and spend valuable time with your friends and family.

    Preparation is key when planning a picnic – this can save you plenty of time on the day of the event, and guarantee that you don’t forget any essential items. For instance, decide on a picnic basket or box to store your tableware and non-perishable foods within. A simple cooler can then be taken for chilled items including drinks.

    Classic picnic favourites including deli chicken, seasoned sausages, cheese and fruit can be served in small Ramekin dishes whilst breads and other meats are best shared on Platters. Always take sets of Plates and Bowls, bearing in mind that Bowls are the new Plates! Bowls are ideal for holding a range of different foods, they will also prevent any spillages and are easily stacked and stored. Taking an arrangement of different shapes and colours of tableware looks beautifully eclectic and suits the theming and mood of a summer picnic.

    For the Plates that are taken, choose Salad Plates as they are an amenable size and can be used for savoury and sweet dishes. Small Side Bowls have been designed to hold sauces, which makes them ideal for dips, oils as well as olives, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese. For dessert, choosing capacious Bowls which suit mousses, creme brulees, cakes and fruit pies. As part of our exclusive James Martin collection, the 5 Piece Cheese Knife Set is the perfect, compact kit to bring along with you for serving and sharing different cheeses. This Set incorporates four cheese knives and the versatile case which doubles as a contemporary cheese board.

    Finally, take the time to make a refreshing drink of elderflower cordial, cucumber and mint water or raspberry lemonade. If you are concerned about taking glassware with you, serve everyone a drink in a beautiful and durable stoneware Mug, or opt for a set of glass Tumblers if preferred. Our Heritage collections contain an array of sunshine hued Mugs, perfect for a picnic setting.

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  • The Perfect Pottery for your Picnic

    With summertime fast approaching, now is the time to start planning a picnic. From parks to hilltops, riversides to beaches, a picnic is a great way to relish the outdoors, savour fresh food and spend valuable time with your friends and family.

    Preparation is key when planning a picnic – this can save you plenty of time on the day of the event, and guarantee that you don’t forget any essential items. For instance, decide on a picnic basket or box to store your tableware and non-perishable foods within. A simple cooler can then be taken for chilled items including drinks.

    Classic picnic favourites including deli chicken, seasoned sausages, cheese and fruit can be served in small Ramekin dishes whilst breads and other meats are best shared on Platters. Always take sets of Plates and Bowls, bearing in mind that Bowls are the new Plates! Bowls are ideal for holding a range of different foods, they will also prevent any spillages and are easily stacked and stored. Taking an arrangement of different shapes and colours of tableware looks beautifully eclectic and suits the theming and mood of a summer picnic.

    For the Plates that are taken, choose Salad Plates as they are an amenable size and can be used for savoury and sweet dishes. Small Side Bowls have been designed to hold sauces, which makes them ideal for dips, oils as well as olives, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese. For dessert, choosing capacious Bowls which suit mousses, creme brulees, cakes and fruit pies. As part of our exclusive James Martin collection, the 5 Piece Cheese Knife Set is the perfect, compact kit to bring along with you for serving and sharing different cheeses. This Set incorporates four cheese knives and the versatile case which doubles as a contemporary cheese board.

    Finally, take the time to make a refreshing drink of elderflower cordial, cucumber and mint water or raspberry lemonade. If you are concerned about taking glassware with you, serve everyone a drink in a beautiful and durable stoneware Mug, or opt for a set of glass Tumblers if preferred. Our Heritage collections contain an array of sunshine hued Mugs, perfect for a picnic setting.

    The Perfect Pottery for your Picnic
  • HASHTAGS
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    name1 The Art of Well Dressing
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    strydesc11 Well dressing is an ancient Derbyshire tradition that involves the arrangement of flower petals and other natural materials onto clay boards. It is a skilful art that is still celebrated in villages across the county today.

    The art of well dressing is believed to have originated around the time of the Black Death in 1348-1349. This harrowing disease was widely spread across the country, however it remained absent from the Derbyshire village of Tissington. The villagers of Tissington attributed this to the purity of the local water supply. In order to give thanks for the water, they began ‘dressing’ the wells and springs in the area. The well dressings encapsulated religious scenes, wildlife, landscapes and cartoon characters and were exceedingly striking and beautiful in their natural design.

    Denby supplies the clay to a number of local well dressings. The clay is first puddled and then set into frames. In the week prior to the celebration, the materials are gathered from the surrounding area. Once the design has been marked out, the intricate process of pressing the petals, berries, bark, seeds, moss, wool and many other natural materials begins – this can take up to seven days. The use of such organic materials aids the design process and allows for the designers to introduce diverse colours, shapes and textures into the clay. The petals are precisely angled with the rounded edge facing downwards to create a smooth surface which prevents rainfall damage. They also draw the water from the clay which helps to preserve the well dressing.

    With thanks to one of our designers, Tom Allen for researching and Shaun Walters for the photos of Waingroves well dressings. Derbyshire’s well dressings are run from May through to September – you can find the full calendar for 2016 here.
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    desc11 Well dressing is an ancient Derbyshire tradition that involves the arrangement of flower petals and other natural materials onto clay boards. It is a skilful art that is still celebrated in villages across the county today.

    The art of well dressing is believed to have originated around the time of the Black Death in 1348-1349. This harrowing disease was widely spread across the country, however it remained absent from the Derbyshire village of Tissington. The villagers of Tissington attributed this to the purity of the local water supply. In order to give thanks for the water, they began ‘dressing’ the wells and springs in the area. The well dressings encapsulated religious scenes, wildlife, landscapes and cartoon characters and were exceedingly striking and beautiful in their natural design.

    Denby supplies the clay to a number of local well dressings. The clay is first puddled and then set into frames. In the week prior to the celebration, the materials are gathered from the surrounding area. Once the design has been marked out, the intricate process of pressing the petals, berries, bark, seeds, moss, wool and many other natural materials begins – this can take up to seven days. The use of such organic materials aids the design process and allows for the designers to introduce diverse colours, shapes and textures into the clay. The petals are precisely angled with the rounded edge facing downwards to create a smooth surface which prevents rainfall damage. They also draw the water from the clay which helps to preserve the well dressing.

    With thanks to one of our designers, Tom Allen for researching and Shaun Walters for the photos of Waingroves well dressings. Derbyshire’s well dressings are run from May through to September – you can find the full calendar for 2016 here.
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  • The Art of Well Dressing

    Well dressing is an ancient Derbyshire tradition that involves the arrangement of flower petals and other natural materials onto clay boards. It is a skilful art that is still celebrated in villages across the county today.

    The art of well dressing is believed to have originated around the time of the Black Death in 1348-1349. This harrowing disease was widely spread across the country, however it remained absent from the Derbyshire village of Tissington. The villagers of Tissington attributed this to the purity of the local water supply. In order to give thanks for the water, they began ‘dressing’ the wells and springs in the area. The well dressings encapsulated religious scenes, wildlife, landscapes and cartoon characters and were exceedingly striking and beautiful in their natural design.

    Denby supplies the clay to a number of local well dressings. The clay is first puddled and then set into frames. In the week prior to the celebration, the materials are gathered from the surrounding area. Once the design has been marked out, the intricate process of pressing the petals, berries, bark, seeds, moss, wool and many other natural materials begins – this can take up to seven days. The use of such organic materials aids the design process and allows for the designers to introduce diverse colours, shapes and textures into the clay. The petals are precisely angled with the rounded edge facing downwards to create a smooth surface which prevents rainfall damage. They also draw the water from the clay which helps to preserve the well dressing.

    With thanks to one of our designers, Tom Allen for researching and Shaun Walters for the photos of Waingroves well dressings. Derbyshire’s well dressings are run from May through to September – you can find the full calendar for 2016 here.

    The Art of Well Dressing
  • HASHTAGS
    sku1
    name1 The Wholefood Warrior's Cucumber and Fennel Salad
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    strydesc11 Nutritionist, Eva Humphries from the wellness blog Wholefood Warrior has created a nourishing cucumber and fennel salad with a ginger and lime dressing on a beautiful Halo Plate - the perfect dish to enjoy in the upcoming summer months!

    Nothing says summer quite like a refreshing salad. Whether you have it on the side of a BBQ feast or make it the main event of a vegan lunch, this cucumber and fennel salad will add fantastic flavour and a ton of nutrients. Ribbons of cucumber and slices of fennel are balanced out by a tasty lime and ginger dressing. The dressing uses avocado instead of oil, creating a creamy texture akin to mayo (but of course this is miles better for you).

    Ingredients for 2 (multiply as required):

    2 large handfuls of baby leaf salad

    1/4 of a large cucumber, shaved into ribbons using a vegetable peeler

    1/2 fennel bulb, thinly sliced.

    For the dressing:

    1 small avocado

    1 teaspoon of tamari or soy sauce

    Juice of 1 lime

    Zest of 1/2 a lime

    2 teaspoons of honey

    1 tablespoon of water

    1.5 cm piece of ginger, peeled and grated.

    Method:

    - For the salad, assemble all of the ingredients on two plates.

    - For the dressing, mash the avocado with a fork until creamy.

    - Add the remaining ingredients. Stir well and drizzle over the salad.

    - Enjoy the goodness.
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    desc11 Nutritionist, Eva Humphries from the wellness blog Wholefood Warrior has created a nourishing cucumber and fennel salad with a ginger and lime dressing on a beautiful Halo Plate - the perfect dish to enjoy in the upcoming summer months!

    Nothing says summer quite like a refreshing salad. Whether you have it on the side of a BBQ feast or make it the main event of a vegan lunch, this cucumber and fennel salad will add fantastic flavour and a ton of nutrients. Ribbons of cucumber and slices of fennel are balanced out by a tasty lime and ginger dressing. The dressing uses avocado instead of oil, creating a creamy texture akin to mayo (but of course this is miles better for you).

    Ingredients for 2 (multiply as required):

    2 large handfuls of baby leaf salad

    1/4 of a large cucumber, shaved into ribbons using a vegetable peeler

    1/2 fennel bulb, thinly sliced.

    For the dressing:

    1 small avocado

    1 teaspoon of tamari or soy sauce

    Juice of 1 lime

    Zest of 1/2 a lime

    2 teaspoons of honey

    1 tablespoon of water

    1.5 cm piece of ginger, peeled and grated.

    Method:

    - For the salad, assemble all of the ingredients on two plates.

    - For the dressing, mash the avocado with a fork until creamy.

    - Add the remaining ingredients. Stir well and drizzle over the salad.

    - Enjoy the goodness.
    directory1 /content/ebiz/denby/stry/the-wholefood-warriors
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  • Nutritionist, Eva Humphries from the wellness blog Wholefood Warrior has created a nourishing cucumber and fennel salad with a ginger and lime dressing on a beautiful Halo Plate - the perfect dish to enjoy in the upcoming summer months!

    Nothing says summer quite like a refreshing salad. Whether you have it on the side of a BBQ feast or make it the main event of a vegan lunch, this cucumber and fennel salad will add fantastic flavour and a ton of nutrients. Ribbons of cucumber and slices of fennel are balanced out by a tasty lime and ginger dressing. The dressing uses avocado instead of oil, creating a creamy texture akin to mayo (but of course this is miles better for you).

    Ingredients for 2 (multiply as required):

    2 large handfuls of baby leaf salad

    1/4 of a large cucumber, shaved into ribbons using a vegetable peeler

    1/2 fennel bulb, thinly sliced.

    For the dressing:

    1 small avocado

    1 teaspoon of tamari or soy sauce

    Juice of 1 lime

    Zest of 1/2 a lime

    2 teaspoons of honey

    1 tablespoon of water

    1.5 cm piece of ginger, peeled and grated.

    Method:

    - For the salad, assemble all of the ingredients on two plates.

    - For the dressing, mash the avocado with a fork until creamy.

    - Add the remaining ingredients. Stir well and drizzle over the salad.

    - Enjoy the goodness.

    The Wholefood Warrior's Cucumber and Fennel Salad
  • HASHTAGS
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    strydesc11 Our Senior Designer, Nicola Wilson recently visited a number of primary schools in Derbyshire and held creative clay workshops. Read more of her story below…

    Over the last few months, I have been out and about visiting local primary schools to work with children to create a wonderful variety of clay animals. Many schools do not have the facilities to work with anything but air drying clay and so, with Denby's 200 year history and manufacturing experience on their doorsteps, it's been a great opportunity to take Denby into schools.

    After an initial talk about Denby and our longstanding history of making animals, the children were given guidance on how to work with clay. The finished creations were then transported back to the factory to be fired and glazed. Our glazing team put aside tableware for the morning and put their skills to use on the animals. As you can see, all the children made amazing animals!

    With thanks to all of the children in Years 5 and 6 at Holmgate School in Clay Cross and Years 3 to 5 at Pottery Primary School in Belper.

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    desc11 Our Senior Designer, Nicola Wilson recently visited a number of primary schools in Derbyshire and held creative clay workshops. Read more of her story below…

    Over the last few months, I have been out and about visiting local primary schools to work with children to create a wonderful variety of clay animals. Many schools do not have the facilities to work with anything but air drying clay and so, with Denby's 200 year history and manufacturing experience on their doorsteps, it's been a great opportunity to take Denby into schools.

    After an initial talk about Denby and our longstanding history of making animals, the children were given guidance on how to work with clay. The finished creations were then transported back to the factory to be fired and glazed. Our glazing team put aside tableware for the morning and put their skills to use on the animals. As you can see, all the children made amazing animals!

    With thanks to all of the children in Years 5 and 6 at Holmgate School in Clay Cross and Years 3 to 5 at Pottery Primary School in Belper.

    directory1 /content/ebiz/denby/stry/pottery-workshops
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  • Pottery Workshops

    Our Senior Designer, Nicola Wilson recently visited a number of primary schools in Derbyshire and held creative clay workshops. Read more of her story below…

    Over the last few months, I have been out and about visiting local primary schools to work with children to create a wonderful variety of clay animals. Many schools do not have the facilities to work with anything but air drying clay and so, with Denby's 200 year history and manufacturing experience on their doorsteps, it's been a great opportunity to take Denby into schools.

    After an initial talk about Denby and our longstanding history of making animals, the children were given guidance on how to work with clay. The finished creations were then transported back to the factory to be fired and glazed. Our glazing team put aside tableware for the morning and put their skills to use on the animals. As you can see, all the children made amazing animals!

    With thanks to all of the children in Years 5 and 6 at Holmgate School in Clay Cross and Years 3 to 5 at Pottery Primary School in Belper.

    Pottery Workshops
  • HASHTAGS
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    name1 Creating your Wedding Gift List
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    strydesc11 Putting together your gift list is an exciting activity in the run-up to your big day; it traditionally happens around three months prior to your wedding giving plenty of time for your guests to make their purchases and arrange deliveries. The gift list is an important exercise, which is best done together in order to truly contemplate what you are going to need in your new marital lives.

    Depending on your life stage, you may already have your essential tableware but are instead looking to own some high- quality cookware. Alternatively, you may be moving in together for the first time and are looking to attain some basic gifts including a full dinner set, cutlery and everyday cookware. When compiling the list, it is important to think long-term, and consider what gifts would make both beautiful and practical additions to your home. Furthermore, you must also include an assortment of gifts at contrastive prices, to suit your varying guest’s budgets.

    It is up to you as to whether your gift list extends over a variety of categories, or maintains a single theme such as cookware. Perhaps if you feel that you have all of the kitchen utensils and cookware that you need, but have always dreamed of owning an extensive tableware set to suit every occasion, then opting for a themed gift list may work extraordinarily well.

    Ultimately, your gift list is what you and your partner have always dreamed of receiving – don’t panic if you have chosen items of great value, there is always the option for guests to organise to purchase a gift as a group. Also bear in mind that you do not want to double up on items, so be specific when detailing your list.

    Enjoy the process of putting this special list together and don’t forget to keep a note of who bought which item to assist you when writing thank-you cards.
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    desc11 Putting together your gift list is an exciting activity in the run-up to your big day; it traditionally happens around three months prior to your wedding giving plenty of time for your guests to make their purchases and arrange deliveries. The gift list is an important exercise, which is best done together in order to truly contemplate what you are going to need in your new marital lives.

    Depending on your life stage, you may already have your essential tableware but are instead looking to own some high- quality cookware. Alternatively, you may be moving in together for the first time and are looking to attain some basic gifts including a full dinner set, cutlery and everyday cookware. When compiling the list, it is important to think long-term, and consider what gifts would make both beautiful and practical additions to your home. Furthermore, you must also include an assortment of gifts at contrastive prices, to suit your varying guest’s budgets.

    It is up to you as to whether your gift list extends over a variety of categories, or maintains a single theme such as cookware. Perhaps if you feel that you have all of the kitchen utensils and cookware that you need, but have always dreamed of owning an extensive tableware set to suit every occasion, then opting for a themed gift list may work extraordinarily well.

    Ultimately, your gift list is what you and your partner have always dreamed of receiving – don’t panic if you have chosen items of great value, there is always the option for guests to organise to purchase a gift as a group. Also bear in mind that you do not want to double up on items, so be specific when detailing your list.

    Enjoy the process of putting this special list together and don’t forget to keep a note of who bought which item to assist you when writing thank-you cards.
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  • Creating your Wedding Gift List

    Putting together your gift list is an exciting activity in the run-up to your big day; it traditionally happens around three months prior to your wedding giving plenty of time for your guests to make their purchases and arrange deliveries. The gift list is an important exercise, which is best done together in order to truly contemplate what you are going to need in your new marital lives.

    Depending on your life stage, you may already have your essential tableware but are instead looking to own some high- quality cookware. Alternatively, you may be moving in together for the first time and are looking to attain some basic gifts including a full dinner set, cutlery and everyday cookware. When compiling the list, it is important to think long-term, and consider what gifts would make both beautiful and practical additions to your home. Furthermore, you must also include an assortment of gifts at contrastive prices, to suit your varying guest’s budgets.

    It is up to you as to whether your gift list extends over a variety of categories, or maintains a single theme such as cookware. Perhaps if you feel that you have all of the kitchen utensils and cookware that you need, but have always dreamed of owning an extensive tableware set to suit every occasion, then opting for a themed gift list may work extraordinarily well.

    Ultimately, your gift list is what you and your partner have always dreamed of receiving – don’t panic if you have chosen items of great value, there is always the option for guests to organise to purchase a gift as a group. Also bear in mind that you do not want to double up on items, so be specific when detailing your list.

    Enjoy the process of putting this special list together and don’t forget to keep a note of who bought which item to assist you when writing thank-you cards.

    Creating your Wedding Gift List
  • HASHTAGS
    sku1
    name1 The History of the Bowl
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    strydesc11 With our recent appearance in Channel 4's ‘What Britain Buys’ this week and the growing popularity of the bowl shape, we are celebrating looking back at the history of this traditional tableware piece.

    In Medieval times, plates or ‘trenchers’ made of stale bread were used for people to eat off. These were baked using coarse flour, making them exceedingly rigid and strong. Trenchers were the inspiration behind the first plates created in the 5th century and at this time, plates were only available to the elite. It was in the 19th century that the traditional dinner plate become mass-produced, and much more accessible to the public.

    In Denby’s earliest years, it was solely utilitarian jars and containers that were first manufactured. The bottles were used for storage and were particularly popular due to their durability, strength and non- porous quality. The first mention of a bowl shape can be traced back to the 1800s and includes the Wesley Centenary Bowl (pictured below), which was a highly decorative piece to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the birth of the founder of Methodism. This bowl was the first piece to instigate our commitment to creating distinctive salt-glazed stoneware, of the highest quality. Numerous shapes, sizes and colours of bowls have followed with the launch of new tableware collections in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Now in modern-day, bowls are an everyday necessity, used for cooking, baking, dining and decorating. The healthy eating trend has immensely contributed towards the preference of bowls as the ideal container to help you display and experiment with interesting ingredients and recipes.

    Using a bowl makes mixing and matching foods easy, and provides you with the perfect shape on which to present every meal; from a sumptuous dessert to a superfood salad or curry, the bowl holds them all in great style. The bowl is also a highly photogenic piece, due to its ability to amass its contents together. In addition, fans of international cuisine are now choosing the bowl over the plate, as the rounded bowl design suits food types including noodles and rice.

    We now produce 32 different styles of bowl, and have recently launched our new collection Natural Canvas, which encompasses a standalone 12-piece Bowl Set as well as a variety of singular bowls including Serving Bowls, Nesting Bowls and Noodle Bowls – it’s a fact, the bowl is here to stay!

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    desc11 With our recent appearance in Channel 4's ‘What Britain Buys’ this week and the growing popularity of the bowl shape, we are celebrating looking back at the history of this traditional tableware piece.

    In Medieval times, plates or ‘trenchers’ made of stale bread were used for people to eat off. These were baked using coarse flour, making them exceedingly rigid and strong. Trenchers were the inspiration behind the first plates created in the 5th century and at this time, plates were only available to the elite. It was in the 19th century that the traditional dinner plate become mass-produced, and much more accessible to the public.

    In Denby’s earliest years, it was solely utilitarian jars and containers that were first manufactured. The bottles were used for storage and were particularly popular due to their durability, strength and non- porous quality. The first mention of a bowl shape can be traced back to the 1800s and includes the Wesley Centenary Bowl (pictured below), which was a highly decorative piece to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the birth of the founder of Methodism. This bowl was the first piece to instigate our commitment to creating distinctive salt-glazed stoneware, of the highest quality. Numerous shapes, sizes and colours of bowls have followed with the launch of new tableware collections in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Now in modern-day, bowls are an everyday necessity, used for cooking, baking, dining and decorating. The healthy eating trend has immensely contributed towards the preference of bowls as the ideal container to help you display and experiment with interesting ingredients and recipes.

    Using a bowl makes mixing and matching foods easy, and provides you with the perfect shape on which to present every meal; from a sumptuous dessert to a superfood salad or curry, the bowl holds them all in great style. The bowl is also a highly photogenic piece, due to its ability to amass its contents together. In addition, fans of international cuisine are now choosing the bowl over the plate, as the rounded bowl design suits food types including noodles and rice.

    We now produce 32 different styles of bowl, and have recently launched our new collection Natural Canvas, which encompasses a standalone 12-piece Bowl Set as well as a variety of singular bowls including Serving Bowls, Nesting Bowls and Noodle Bowls – it’s a fact, the bowl is here to stay!

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  • The History of the Bowl

    With our recent appearance in Channel 4's ‘What Britain Buys’ this week and the growing popularity of the bowl shape, we are celebrating looking back at the history of this traditional tableware piece.

    In Medieval times, plates or ‘trenchers’ made of stale bread were used for people to eat off. These were baked using coarse flour, making them exceedingly rigid and strong. Trenchers were the inspiration behind the first plates created in the 5th century and at this time, plates were only available to the elite. It was in the 19th century that the traditional dinner plate become mass-produced, and much more accessible to the public.

    In Denby’s earliest years, it was solely utilitarian jars and containers that were first manufactured. The bottles were used for storage and were particularly popular due to their durability, strength and non- porous quality. The first mention of a bowl shape can be traced back to the 1800s and includes the Wesley Centenary Bowl (pictured below), which was a highly decorative piece to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the birth of the founder of Methodism. This bowl was the first piece to instigate our commitment to creating distinctive salt-glazed stoneware, of the highest quality. Numerous shapes, sizes and colours of bowls have followed with the launch of new tableware collections in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Now in modern-day, bowls are an everyday necessity, used for cooking, baking, dining and decorating. The healthy eating trend has immensely contributed towards the preference of bowls as the ideal container to help you display and experiment with interesting ingredients and recipes.

    Using a bowl makes mixing and matching foods easy, and provides you with the perfect shape on which to present every meal; from a sumptuous dessert to a superfood salad or curry, the bowl holds them all in great style. The bowl is also a highly photogenic piece, due to its ability to amass its contents together. In addition, fans of international cuisine are now choosing the bowl over the plate, as the rounded bowl design suits food types including noodles and rice.

    We now produce 32 different styles of bowl, and have recently launched our new collection Natural Canvas, which encompasses a standalone 12-piece Bowl Set as well as a variety of singular bowls including Serving Bowls, Nesting Bowls and Noodle Bowls – it’s a fact, the bowl is here to stay!

    The History of the Bowl